Do interim results need a warning label?
Interim results from clinical trials are usually highly publicised and published in very prestigious journals, but the final results of these studies rarely make headlines and always seem to appear in less prominent journals. Research has shown that looking at interim results can lead to bias through changes in the primary outcome, introduction or modification of subgroup analyses, and selective reporting of particular outcomes. Because of this, some argue that medical journals should publish fewer interim results and commit to making the final results known when they become available.
Interim results from clinical trials are usually highly publicised and published in very prestigious journals, with much less emphasis and importance being given to the final results. Are you for or against habitually publishing interim results?

Last Answered: 2 weeks ago